Volume 63 (2013) Issue: 2013 No#5-6

PERFORMANCE OF BROILER CHICKEN FED VARIED NUTRIENT DENSITY DIETS SUPPLEMENTED WITH DIRECT FED MICROBIAL

Author(s): KATOCH S, SHARMA KA, CHAHOTA R, SHARMA KS, MARKOVIĆ RADMILA, ŠEFER D

Keywords:broiler, calcium, feed, microbes, phosphorus, probiotics

Comparative dietary response of different isolated strains (Direct fed microbial- DFM) of lactobacilli, streptococci and yeast isolated from leopard feces (Panthera leo) was studied as probiotic in poultry broiler birds reared as per varied mineral densities viz. calcium and phosphorus. Various treatments consisted of T0 (Control, culture medium), T1 (Lactobacillus casei + Streptococcus fecalis + Saccharomyces cerevisiae) offered standard formulated diet D1, T2 – Control (Culture medium) offered ten percent lower calcium and phosphorus diet D2, T3 (Lactobacillus casei + Streptococcus fecalis + Saccharomyces cerevisiae) offered ten percent lower calcium and phosphorus diet D2. Growth results obtained during the starter phase (1st to 3rd week) exhibited higher gain in live body weight and lower feed conversion ratio, both by DFM supplemented treatment T1 offered standard formulated diet D1 and treatment T3 offered experimentally formulated mineral (Ca and P) deficient (10%) diet D2 compared to respective control T0 and T2. The obtained results revealed a significantly higher growth performance in treatment T1 compared to its control T0 where a higher growth in treatment T3 offered experimentally formulated mineral (Ca and P) deficient (10%) diet D2 supplemented with isolated DFM compared to its control T2 was exhibited. Treatment groups T1 and T3 supplemented with isolated DFM exhibited a better intestinal micro flora balance, effective colonization and higher count in the intestinal tract with higher calcium and phosphorus retention in the digestibility studies. Thus, it was found that supplementation of isolated DFM has the potential to improve biological growth performance of poultry broiler birds offered both standard formulated diet D1, as well as mineral deficient diet D2.


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ISSN: 0567-8315

eISSN: 1820-7448

Journal Impact Factor 2017: 0.604

5-Year Impact Factor: 0.439

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